Strings

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For asserting whether a string is null, empty, contains whitespace only, or is in upper/lower case, you have a wide range of methods to your disposal.

string theString = "";
theString.Should().NotBeNull();
theString.Should().BeNull();
theString.Should().BeEmpty();
theString.Should().NotBeEmpty("because the string is not empty");
theString.Should().HaveLength(0);
theString.Should().BeNullOrWhiteSpace(); // either null, empty or whitespace only
theString.Should().NotBeNullOrWhiteSpace();

To ensure the characters in a string are all (not) upper or lower cased, you can use the following assertions.

theString.Should().BeUpperCased();
theString.Should().NotBeUpperCased();
theString.Should().BeLowerCased();
theString.Should().NotBeLowerCased();

However, be careful that numbers and special characters don’t have casing, so BeUpperCased and BeLowerCased will always fail on a string that contains anything but alphabetic characters. In those cases, we recommend using NotBeUpperCased or NotBeLowerCased.

Obviously you’ll find all the methods you would expect for string assertions.

theString = "This is a String";
theString.Should().Be("This is a String");
theString.Should().NotBe("This is another String");
theString.Should().BeEquivalentTo("THIS IS A STRING");
theString.Should().NotBeEquivalentTo("THIS IS ANOTHER STRING");

theString.Should().BeOneOf(
    "That is a String",
    "This is a String",
);

theString.Should().Contain("is a");
theString.Should().Contain("is a", Exactly.Once());
theString.Should().Contain("is a", AtLeast.Twice());
theString.Should().Contain("is a", MoreThan.Thrice());
theString.Should().Contain("is a", AtMost.Times(5));
theString.Should().Contain("is a", LessThan.Twice());
theString.Should().ContainAll("should", "contain", "all", "of", "these");
theString.Should().ContainAny("any", "of", "these", "will", "do");
theString.Should().NotContain("is a");
theString.Should().NotContainAll("can", "contain", "some", "but", "not", "all");
theString.Should().NotContainAny("can't", "contain", "any", "of", "these");
theString.Should().ContainEquivalentOf("WE DONT CARE ABOUT THE CASING");
theString.Should().ContainEquivalentOf("WE DONT CARE ABOUT THE CASING", Exactly.Once());
theString.Should().ContainEquivalentOf("WE DONT CARE ABOUT THE CASING", AtLeast.Twice());
theString.Should().ContainEquivalentOf("WE DONT CARE ABOUT THE CASING", MoreThan.Thrice());
theString.Should().ContainEquivalentOf("WE DONT CARE ABOUT THE CASING", AtMost.Times(5));
theString.Should().ContainEquivalentOf("WE DONT CARE ABOUT THE CASING", LessThan.Twice());
theString.Should().NotContainEquivalentOf("HeRe ThE CaSiNg Is IgNoReD As WeLl");

theString.Should().StartWith("This");
theString.Should().NotStartWith("This");
theString.Should().StartWithEquivalentOf("this");
theString.Should().NotStartWithEquivalentOf("this");

theString.Should().EndWith("a String");
theString.Should().NotEndWith("a String");
theString.Should().EndWithEquivalentOf("a string");
theString.Should().NotEndWithEquivalentOf("a string");

For the Match, NotMatch, MatchEquivalentOf, and NotMatchEquivalentOf methods we support wildcards.

The pattern can be a combination of literal and wildcard characters, but it doesn’t support regular expressions.

The following wildcard specifiers are permitted in the pattern:

Wilcard specifier Matches
* (asterisk) Zero or more characters in that position.
? (question mark) Exactly one character in that position.

For instance, if you would like to assert that some email address is correct, use this:

emailAddress.Should().Match("*@*.com");
homeAddress.Should().NotMatch("*@*.com");

If the casing of the input string is irrelevant, use this:

emailAddress.Should().MatchEquivalentOf("*@*.COM");
emailAddress.Should().NotMatchEquivalentOf("*@*.COM");

And if wildcards aren’t enough for you, you can always use some regular expression magic:

someString.Should().MatchRegex("h.*\\sworld.$");
someString.Should().MatchRegex(new Regex("h.*\\sworld.$"));
subject.Should().NotMatchRegex(new Regex(".*earth.*"));
subject.Should().NotMatchRegex(".*earth.*");

And if that’s not enough, you can assert on the number of matches of a regular expression:

someString.Should().MatchRegex("h.*\\sworld.$", Exactly.Once());
someString.Should().MatchRegex(new Regex("h.*\\sworld.$"), AtLeast.Twice());